Friday, February 14, 2014

Hiram Grange and the Village of the Damned

Hiram Grange and the Village of the Damned, by Jake Burrows, is the first in a new series of novellas, the Hiram Grange Misadventures, written by different authors for Shroud Publishing:
Welcome to the scandalous misadventures of scurrilous boozer and malcontent, Hiram Grange. Though afflicted with a laundry list of dysfunctions, addictions and odd predilections, Hiram Grange stands toe to toe (and sometimes toe to tentacle) with the black-hearted denizens of the Abyss and dispenses justice with the help of his antiquated Webley revolver and Pritchard bayonet.  A five-part series. Cover and illustrations by Malcolm McClinton, and original woodcut prints by Danny Evarts
Available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, BooksAMillion, and AbeBooks. The series is also available in a five-book set: Hiram Grange Volume 1 (5 book Set).

The Blurb

Something wicked walks the streets of the picturesque New Hampshire village of Great Bay--something that has inexplicably risen from the grave to wreak a horrifying vengeance. Only one man can stop it--provided he can stay sober long enough to answer the call!

Hiram Grange and the Village of the Damned introduces readers to the scurrilous boozer and malcontent, Hiram Grange. Though afflicted with a laundry list of dysfunctions, addictions and odd predilections, Hiram Grange stands toe to toe (and sometimes toe to tentacle) with the black-hearted denizens of the Abyss and dispenses justice with the help of his antiquated Webley revolver and Pritchard bayonet.

The first of a five part series. Cover and illustrations by Malcolm McClinton, and original woodcut prints by Danny Evarts.




My Review
Hiram Grange and the Village of the Damned by Jake Burrows

Quirky

The quirky bit of this series is that many authors have contributed to its creation, reminding me of all the ghostwritten series I read as a kid. Except I know who the actual writers are in this series and, when I like one story better than the rest, I can go gorge on that writer's work.

In many ways, the anti-hero of this story, Hiram Grange, reminds me of Sherlock Holmes' mirror image. Or it might be easier to describe Grange as what would happen if Indiana Jones and Sherlock Holmes got stuck in a room with Anita Blake while her ardeur is in full force - the action of Indy with all of Holme's flaws and Blake's paranormality (with less sex).

France's story is shorter, with a less complex plot (because of its size), and the supernatural elements of the story aren't as fleshed out (which I expect to be built upon in future installments).

The story/series has a strong drug element, which I usually find off-putting but I like that we see Grange screwing up when he uses - given the parallel with Holmes, it makes me ask questions about how the rest of the series will progress and I'm eager to read the next book to see if I get answers.

View all my reviews

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